Evidence Summary
10 Jun 2017
30 views

State of the World’s Fathers: Latin America and the Caribbean (Executive Summary)

Promundo
Promundo
Region of the Americas
5 mins
Download the summary
What you'll learn
Fatherhood in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Key learnings and recommendations derived from the State of the World’s Fathers: Latin America and the Caribbean Report 2015 that looks into men’s engagement in issues directly related to fatherhood in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)
  • Equitable fatherhood has many benefits including better child development and health for the father
  • Recommendations for promoting men’s participation in fatherhood
Promoting men's participation in fatherhood
Equitable parenting benefits all
Currently, in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), barriers like traditional gender norms, legal custody barriers, and socioeconomic pressure discourage men from actively engaging in caregiver and parenting roles. Evidence shows that equitable fatherhood has many benefits including better child development and health for the father, which also allows women to have more opportunities in the labour market and in society. By implementing recommended policies and programs, men in LAC may be more empowered to fulfil fatherhood roles, which will improve gender equity both inside and out of the household and come with many improvements to health.
A man walks in front of a bright pink wall in Santo Domingo.

Greater participation by men in housework, caregiving, and parenting will not solve all of the world’s problems, but it will resolve those concerning an ethic of caregiving, justice, and inclusion, while questioning the patriarchy and machismo’s logic of power, indifference, violence, and exclusion.

Key Takeaways
1
Promote men's participation in fatherhood
Promote men's participation in fatherhood
Work programmes and policies that support and promote men’s fatherhood and share responsibilities, such as paid paternity leave, contributes to men’s greater engagement in caregiving and parenting. Greater participation of men in daily caregiving and parenting improves children’s development and well-being and contributes to gender equality.
2
Build the evidence base
Build the evidence base
Further data collection on the positive effects of policies and programs on fatherhood involvement is needed to increase institutes involvement in creating more of these policies.
3
Implement sexual education programs aimed at men and boys
Implement sexual education programs aimed at men and boys
Designing sexual education programs aimed at men and boys not only helps increase male’s knowledge of sexually transmitted infections, unsafe abortions, sexual assault, etc. It also educates men on their active role in women’s sexual and reproductive choices that leads them to assume equal responsibility for the consequences of these choices.
4
Use social and community campaigns to change norms
Use social and community campaigns to change norms
Social and community campaigns to alter norms around male participation in caregiving and housework, helps promote positive involvement by men and fathers in housework and caregiving, and encourages nonviolence and shared responsibilities attitudes.

Fathers’ participation has been linked to improved cognitive development and academic performance, improved mental health among children, empathy and social skills, and lower delinquency rates in sons.

A wall in Cuba with the words Revolucion on it.

    We would love to know
    How useful was this resource?
    Not at all
    1
    Very useful
    Could you tell us...
    What would make it more useful?
    We'll share it with them for you
    Who else would find this useful?
    + Add email here
    Next

    Toolkit
    10 Jul 2013
    29 views
    Addressing Gender and Women’s Empowerment in mHealth for MNCH
    Case Study
    25 Sep 2017
    30 views
    Changing times? Gender roles and relationships in maternal, newborn and child health in Malawi
    Toolkit
    10 Jun 2019
    30 views
    Promoting gender equality in sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health: Programming Guide