Infographic
23 Mar 2021
78 views

Gender-Based Violence Response Services: An Infographic Series

United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (U...+1 more
United Nations University International Institute for Global Health (UNU-IIGH)
Global
5 mins
8 downloads
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Covid-19, Essential Health Services and Gender Equity
Part of an infographic series
  • COVID-19 responses have led to an increased risk of gender-based violence (GBV)
  • Innovative access points and digital options for GBV response services have improved accessibility for some women
  • Provides practices and approaches to mitigate the impacts of GBV

This infographic is part of a series of four infographics focusing on the intersection of gender and Covid-19 and covering the following topics:

About the infographic
What you'll find
With a focus on countries in the Global South, this infographic illustrates how COVID-19 responses have led to increased risk of GBV and what practices and approaches countries have used to address it.
Best practice approaches
In best-practice, GBV support services consider the heightened risks of specific groups, including women with disabilities, transgender women, sex workers, and migrants.
A woman stands in China looking out from under a wide brim hat.

In several countries – including Solomon Islands, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Costa Rica, Portugal, Tonga and Canada – domestic violence services were declared essential services so that they could keep running.

Key Takeaways
1
Perpetration and experiences of GBV have increased
Perpetration and experiences of GBV have increased
COVID-19 responses have led to an increased risk of GBV. Specific groups – including women healthcare workers, women with disabilities, LGBTQIA+ people, sex workers and migrant women – have heightened risks for GBV.
2
Survivors, including women facing intersecting inequalities, encounter reduced resources and access to essential health services
Survivors, including women facing intersecting inequalities, encounter reduced resources and access to essential health services
According to a Marie Stopes survey of women in India, 1 in 5 of respondents seeking an abortion service (21%) or contraceptive services (18%) reported not being able to attend a face-to-face appointment for fear of leaving their home whilst experiencing domestic abuse.
3
GBV response must be maintained and improved with additional resources
GBV response must be maintained and improved with additional resources
Some countries have been able to maintain and adapt GBV response services to address multiple and intersecting forms of inequalities, delivering effective coverage. Innovative access points and digital options for GBV response services have improved accessibility for some women.
A woman, dressed in a sari, stands in a doorway in India

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