Toolkit
09 Apr 2015
20 views

Enhancing Nutrition and Food Security during the First 1,000 Days through Gender-Sensitive Social and Behavior Change: A Technical Resource Guide

CORE Group Megan Ivankovich, MPH (WI-HER LLC), Taroub Harb Faramand, MD...+1 more
CORE Group
Megan Ivankovich, MPH (WI-HER LLC), Taroub Harb Faramand, MD, MPH (WI-HER LLC)
Global
25 mins
Download the toolkit
Who it's for
Development practitioners working in nutrition and food security

This technical resource guide is designed to build the capacity of development practitioners working in nutrition and food security to plan, implement, and evaluate gender-sensitive social behaviour change (SBC) programming in order to improve nutritional outcomes for pregnant and lactating women (PLW) and children under two. It provides an overview, rationale, critical actions, best practices, resources, and tools for integrating gender-sensitive SBC into project activities.

 

What you'll learn
Gender inequality and food insecurity intersect
Evidence shows a strong correlation between gender inequality and food insecurity. Food security requires physical and economic access to sufficient food to meet dietary needs for a productive and healthy life at all times. It is particularly important during the 1,000 days from conception to a child’s second birthday, where malnutrition can result in lifelong, irreversible damage and compromises maternal, neonatal, and child health, physical and cognitive growth, educational achievement, and productivity as adults.
Key recommendations
Addressing gender-related social norms and behaviours has the potential to improve agricultural productivity, food security, and health and nutrition outcomes for families during the first 1,000 days and beyond. The report presents critical actions for improving the gender sensitivity of SBC programming, as well as best practices, key resources, and tools to improve nutrition and food security during the first 1,000 days and beyond.
Female workers carrying buckets on their heads at the Ubud rice terraces in Indonesia.

Implementing gender-sensitive SBC approaches requires flexibility, regular monitoring of results, and continuous adjustments to approaches to ensure project activities are achieving desired outcomes and reaching the most vulnerable—women and children in the first 1,000 days.

Key Takeaways
1
Gender-sensitive SBC approaches are key
Gender-sensitive SBC approaches are key
Gender-sensitive SBC approaches are defined as behaviour-centred approaches that identify, consider, and account for the needs, abilities, and opportunities of women, men, girls, and boys to enable individuals, households, groups, and communities to adopt evidence-based practices and transform the environment in which behaviour change occurs.Gender-sensitive SBC approaches are essential to increase optimal nutrition practices, demand for services and commodities, and utilization of services, and allow for effective linkages across sectors, spanning health, agriculture, food security, and economic empowerment, among others.
2
Gender-sensitive SBC interventions can improve nutrition outcomes
Gender-sensitive SBC interventions can improve nutrition outcomes
Evidence-based, multisectoral gender-sensitive SBC interventions can improve nutrition outcomes during the 1,000-day window of opportunity in three key impact areas: 1) access to food; 2) maternal and child care; and 3) water, sanitation, and health services.
3
Critical actions for program planning
Critical actions for program planning
Conduct a gender analysis and SBC formative research; Ensure project strategies and plans are gender-sensitive; Strengthen gender-related partnerships; Ensure project objectives and SBC interventions address gender needs and gaps; Make linkages across multiple sectors.
4
Critical actions for program implementation
Critical actions for program implementation
Engage a range of important influencers; Consider the needs and preferences of men and women when implementing activities; Gender and SBC trainings need to be integrated, balanced, and impactful; Review project messages and materials to ensure gender considerations are included, where appropriate; Ensure interventions “do no harm.”
5
Critical actions for program monitoring and evaluation and documentation
Critical actions for program monitoring and evaluation and documentation
Collect and analyse sex-disaggregated and gender-sensitive indicators; Standardise gender-sensitive SBC measures within and between projects; Broaden the evidence base; Document and share results, best practices, and lessons learned.
6
Critical actions for gender mainstreaming
Critical actions for gender mainstreaming
Ensure leadership is supportive of and committed to gender issues; Consider gender issues in the hiring process and workplace; Build capacity of all staff to address gender.

Addressing gender is a community effort and requires broad participation and multi-sectoral linkages to achieve project goals. Transforming habits and preferences around food and care takes effort, research, resources, but the effort and investments are well worth the undertaking and can make an invaluable contribution to the nutritional health and well-being of [all].

A woman holds a basket of rice and shakes it, grains falling into the air towards the camera.

    We would love to know
    How useful was this resource?
    Not at all
    1
    Very useful
    Could you tell us...
    What would make it more useful?
    We'll share it with them for you
    Who else would find this useful?
    + Add email here
    Next

    Report
    09 Sep 2017
    23 views
    Because Women Matter: Designing interventions in food, nutrition and agriculture that allow women to change their lives
    Journal Article
    22 May 2014
    30 views
    Women’s empowerment and child nutritional status in South Asia: a synthesis of the literature